Wednesday, December 1, 2021

The Continuing Existence Of PHARMACEUTIC TRACK AND TRACE SYSTEMS

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Pharmaceutical engineers have many opportunities in the pharmaceutical and bio-tech sectors, as the demand for medicines is increasing day by day. This demand has created a huge demand for manpower in the pharmaceutical industry, both in the pharmaceutical companies as well as in the generic drug retail chain. This has also created huge challenges for pharmaceutical engineers as well as other professionals in the allied healthcare industry.

As they are required in various sectors of the medical industry, there is a huge demand for their services and skills. Some people claim that the pharmaceutical track and trace system reduces the output time and costs in pharmaceutical production, while others believe that this system delays the process. In order to prevent these and other possible issues, an unbiased study should be performed on the pharmaceutical track and trace system in order to establish its suitability in the pharmaceutical industry and the countries should set their own standards based on...

Produced drugs

The pharmaceutical track and trace system can help ensure that drugs are produced at optimum output and in lesser amounts, using cost-effective processes. It helps to make the best use of the existing processing infrastructure by reducing cycle times and cycle phases. By making the manufacturing process more streamlined, it also helps to reduce wastage of products and improve productivity. By streamlining the process, it ensures that high quality products are supplied to the end users.

Pharmacist trace inventory system

The pharmacist trace inventory system is a crucial part of the overall PHARMACEUTICY tracking system and involves the collection of information regarding mixtures and preparations and their storage or disposal. These data are used by pharmacists, physicians and others involved in the treatment of patients. All the records concerning drug storage, preparation, dispense and use are collected as part of the process of drug administration. The records must be maintained by qualified employees of the National Health Information Center (NHIEC) including all the pharmacists in a chain of several hundred pharmacies.

Chain management

Pharmaceutical track and trace systems are designed for the supply chain management of hazardous drugs in the workplaces. In the management of hazardous drugs, two important concepts are used. One is the concept of the "supply chain", which seeks to understand the pathway drugs are delivered through the supply chain. The second concept is "demand flow" which tries to understand the relationship between demand and supply of hazardous drugs. A third concept is "effects of risks" that seeks to assess the risks posed to the environment, workers, patients and other stakeholders of the supply chain.

The supply chain aims to minimize the risks of exposures to hazardous drugs and minimizing the health care costs associated with them. Hence, several pharmaceutical countries aiming at achieving these aims have created systems based on pharmaceutical track and trace solutions. Some countries have also developed their own national pharmaceutical track and trace system. The system of a country depends on its strategy and the nature of the industry.

Global trace

Pharmaceutical countries aiming at achieving the objectives of the Global Harmonization of Pharmaceutical Measures (GHMP) set forth in 2021 have implemented the policy of the global trace policy through the formation of national pharmaceutical crime control units. On the other hand, there are developing countries that have not yet developed national pharmaceutical crime control units.

The present article presents a case study of the pharmaceutical track and trace system in turkey. The analysis of the case study of the pharmaceutical track and trace system in turkey provides important inputs for the decision making of the national pharmaceutical policy of the country.

The main findings of this report are discussed below:

The first finding of the report is that in Turkey there was no adequate evidence of the existence of pharmaceutically important routes of drug exposure and no significant link of routes to various causes of occupational exposure. According to the Turkish Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, there were reports of direct contact cases with drugs, such as contact with phenytoin and carbamazepine, and indirect exposure such as contamination of used equipment by employees of pharmaceutical companies. The only routes of pharmaceutical exposure that were identified were exposure to workers in general.

The lack of any evidence of the presence of direct routes of drug exposure and the lack of a case history of drug use for which a link has been established, leads to the conclusion that there was no adequate evidence of the existence of harmful routes of drug exposure. Based on the Turkish Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs findings, the legal framework of the country does not require immediate action regarding worker drug exposure or any other worker exposed to drugs.

The second finding of this report is that PHARMACEUTICAL TRACK AND TRACE SYSTEMS IN THE EUROPE ARE NOT WORKING. There are no legal provisions or regulations in the first country requiring companies to make their manufacturing facilities fully equipped to monitor and control drug source risks.

Last Words:

The lack of such provisions of laws governing pharmaceutical plant accidents in the first country also leaves the companies with no legal recourse if they fail to comply with safety requirements in their country. For this reason, the lack of adequate PHARMACEUTICAL TRACK AND TRACE SYSTEMS in the first country and the absence of effective supply chain management systems throughout the globe, lead to the continued exposure of thousands of workers to hazardous drugs.

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