Health

Is Methocarbamol An Abusive Drug?

Methocarbamol isn’t a drug. It’s a stimulant and muscle relaxant of the central nervous system (CNS) used to relieve muscle pain, anxiety, and discomfort. Owing to adverse effects such as drowsiness and dizziness, which may sound like a medication “high,” it can be confused for a narcotic. 

For the management of muscle twitches, methocarbamol is often used. It is typically used combined with rest, physical care, and other therapies. It functions by allowing the muscles to relax. 

Robaxin (Methocarbamol) Addiction 

Robaxin is known as having a low risk of contributing to addictive habits. There is a slightly greater risk for diversion of other related carbamate drugs, such as meprobamate. In larger doses, the use of methocarbamol side effects includes sedative symptoms and dysphoria. 

People with a history of drug abuse problems in most recorded cases of methocarbamol misuse. In addition, Robaxin’s abuse profile is comparable to but slightly less extreme, benzodiazepine lorazepam.

What is the normal dosage? 

The dosage of methocarbamol relies on a number of variables. When taking this drug, you should always obey the directions of your health professional. 

methocarbamol comes in 500- and 750-milligram (mg) capsules, the average dose is 1,500 mg, four times daily, for individuals with achy muscles. That means three pills of 500 mg four times a day or two tablets of 750 mg four times a day. 

There is minimal evidence investigating the effectiveness of methocarbamol in adolescents under 16 years of age. Ignore the dosage directions you find on the internet & follow the ones by your doctor if your child has been administered methocarbamol.

Is methocarbamol addictive? 

When taken according to directions by a practitioner, methocarbamol is not addictive. It has an enhanced abuse potential at larger concentrations, particularly among individuals with a history of narcotic addiction.

Side Effects of Methocarbamol 

Methocarbamol does not, however, have the same effects as a narcotic: 

  • It doesn’t ease the discomfort that is generalized. 
  • This does not induce a feeling of euphoria or a “high.” 
  • Higher levels, including drowsiness and dizziness, often bear an elevated chance of adverse side effects. It has a comparatively low propensity for violence, considering these characteristics. 

Not all these symptoms occur at the same time. Moreover, it is unlikely to observe these symptoms if you take this medicine as prescribed by the doctor.

Is it likely to overdose? 

You will overdose on methocarbamol. Reports say that when methocarbamol is administered with alcohol or other sedative medications, an overdose is more probable. 

Overdose symptoms include: 

  • Extreme sleepiness 
  • Extreme dizziness, serious dizziness 
  • Consciousness deprivation 
  • Sweating Sweating 
  • Breathing problems 
  • Trembling hands
  • Convulsions

Wrapping up

Methocarbamol, while some of its symptoms are similar to those of opioids, is not a narcotic. Methocarbamol isn’t toxic, unlike opioids. 

If you have unusual or significant side effects when taking methocarbamol, you should talk to a doctor or another healthcare professional. 

If you are using methocarbamol for recreational purposes, let the doctor know. This makes it easier for them to watch the general wellbeing and to better avoid serious adverse effects or medication reactions.

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